Department of Education

Previous Events

  • Join President Christina H. Paxson in conversation with Sonja Santelises Ed.D. ’89, CEO of Baltimore City Public Schools, and Shalinee Sharma ’99, Co-Founder and CEO of Zearn, as they discuss K-12 education in the time of COVID-19.

    April 24, 2020 at 4:00 p.m.

    Register at:  https://communityconversationspaxsoneducation.eventbrite.com

    Please note:

    Attendees will have the option to submit questions upon registering, as well as to the moderator during the event.

    Livestream will also be available.

    For questions about this event, please write to [email protected] .

  • CANCELED: Engaged Scholars Program (ESP) Info Session

    Location: Swearer Center, 2 Stimson Avenue, Providence, R.I. 02912 Room: Room 120 Cost: Free
    Show Details

    Edit: Effective March 11, 2020, all Brown University-sponsored, in-person direct service community engagement has been suspended. In addition, multiple Swearer Center events have been canceled or postponed. A full list of event and program changes can be found online here . These decisions have been made in the interest of protecting the health and well-being of our multiple communities.

    The Engaged Scholars Program (ESP) enables students who are passionate about communities and the challenges they face to design courses of study and action as part of their concentration requirements. Students who complete the program receive an academic transcript designation as Engaged Scholars.


    Join us for an information session at the Swearer Center (2 Stimson Avenue), Room 120.

    The deadline to declare for ESP April 1. For more information please contact us at [email protected] or visit swearer.brown.edu/esp

  • CANCELED: Building Schools for Disenfranchised Communities: From Thayer Street to the White House

    Location: Watson Institute for International and Public Affairs Room: Joukowsky Forum
    Show Details

    Seth Andrew ’00 graduated from the NYC public schools and went on to study education at Brown and Harvard. An accidental year teaching in Korea taught him that most of what he had learned in college and grad school was dead wrong–and he’s spent the last 20 years trying to fix it. As a special education teacher, principal, superintendent, and founder of the Democracy Prep Public School network, Seth has always focused on building and turning around schools for disenfranchised communities around the world in Rhode Island, New York, New Jersey, Washington DC, Nevada, Louisiana, and Texas as well as Liberia , Kenya, Uganda, Nigeria and India. The success of Democracy Builders earned him a role in President Obama’s White House as Senior Advisor, focused on education and civic technology . Seth is now working to launch a hybrid “charter college” using world-class technology for primarily first-generation college students.

    Hilary Levey Friedman, Visiting Assistant Professor of Education, will moderate the Q&A portion. 

    Co-sponsored by the Department of Education and Watson Institute for International and Public Affairs 

  • CANCELED: Lunch Break: A conversation with Seth Andrew ’00

    Location: 164 Angell Street Room: Room 220
    Show Details

    Seth Andrew ’00 is a serial entrepreneur & CEO who leads Democracy Builders, a social sector studio that has launched more than $1b in enterprises that are changing the face of education, democracy, and technology around the world. He started his career as a special education teacher in South Korea and Massachusetts but is best known as the founder, teacher, principal, and superintendent of Democracy Prep, a network of 25+ public charter schools that was started in 2005 in Harlem, NY. From 2013-2016, Andrew served as a senior advisor and superintendent-in-residence at the U.S. Department of Education, and was a senior advisor to the U.S. Chief Technology Officer at the White House during the Obama administration. 

    Join Andrew for a conversation on life after Brown, his career trajectory, and his experience in technology and education. Lunch will be served.

    Registration is required and limited to 25 students. Register here.

  • Info Session: Concurrent Baccalaureate/MAT Degree Program

    Location: 164 Angell Street Room: Flex Space (Room 202)
    Show Details

    Are you a Brown undergraduate interested in a teaching career? Join faculty from the Master of Arts in Teaching program to learn about the new concurrent baccalaureate/MAT degree program in which you can earn your bachelor’s degree (in a concentration relevant to English, social studies, math, engineering or science) and master’s in teaching in 5 years. Registration is required, register here .

    Apply during your junior year. Applications are due April 1, 2020. The MAT program prepares candidates to meet the needs of structurally disadvantaged students and systems in secondary education (grades 7-12) in English, math, science, and social studies, with a yearlong residency in an urban school, personalized coaching, and rigorous and relevant coursework. Applying during your undergraduate years allows teacher education faculty to advise you in content preparation and guide you toward enriching experiences and opportunities working with youths.

    Can’t make the info session but interested in the program? Email [email protected]

  • Engaged Scholars Program (ESP) Info Session

    Location: Swearer Center, 2 Stimson Avenue, Providence, R.I. 02912 Room: Room 120 Cost: Free
    Show Details

    The Engaged Scholars Program (ESP) enables students who are passionate about communities and the challenges they face to design courses of study and action as part of their concentration requirements. Students who complete the program receive an academic transcript designation as Engaged Scholars.

    Join us for an information session at the Swearer Center (2 Stimson Avenue), Room 120.

    The deadline to declare for ESP April 1. For more information please contact us at [email protected] or visit swearer.brown.edu/esp

    In support of our community’s continued health, if you are not feeling well for any reason, please consider staying home rather than attending the event. For up-to-date information, including campus travel restrictions, please visit the University’s COVID-19 Updates website at covid.brown.edu.

  • Dana Goldstein ─ NYT Reporter on How Education Policies Impact Families, Students and Teachers

    Location: Watson Institute for International and Public Affairs Room: Joukowsky Forum Cost: Free
    Show Details

    NYT Education Reporter discusses her coverage of college admission, segregation/integration, and her path from Brown. Susanna Loeb, director of the Annenberg Institute, will lead the conversation with Dana Goldstein.

  • Education Studies DUG Pizza with a Prof

    Location: 164 Angell Street Room: Room 250
    Show Details

    Join the Education DUG for their series Pizza with a Prof. These informal dinners offer a space for students and professors to get to know each other outside of the classroom. Assistant Professor of Education David Rangel uses a sociological perspective to understand processes that generate social inequality, with emphasis on the Latino experience in the United States. His current work uses social and cultural capital theories and mixed-methods research to study sources of inequality.

    Sponsored by the Education Studies DUG

  • See You Yesterday Film Screening and Panel Discussion

    Location: Stephen Robert ’62 Hall Room: True North Classroom (Room 101)
    Show Details

    “Rare for the genre, See You Yesterday imagines time travel as a way to correct a societal wrong, to undo evil of a more on-the-ground variety: Its protagonists, teenage science whizzes Claudette/CJ (Eden Duncan-Smith) and Sebastian (Dante Crichlow), build a time machine to try to stop CJ’s brother from being shot by police.” — Wired Magazine

    Join film director Stefon Bristol for a screening of his film See You Yesterday, followed by a Q&A session, with Stephon Alexander , Professor of Physics, Nicole Gonzalez Van Cleve , Associate Professor of Sociology, and moderated by Jonathan Collins, Assistant Professor of Education. The film, produced by Spike Lee, focuses on two teenaged science prodigies who spend their time working on their recent invention: backpacks that enable time travel. When one of their older brothers is killed, they put their unfinished project to the test in an effort to save him.

    Brooklyn-born, Long Island-bred, Stefon Bristol is writing his own success story as a fresh face with a creative voice in the indie film world. Bristol is an award-winning filmmaker whose first feature film, See You Yesterday, has received two Independent Spirit Award nominations, Best First Feature and Best First Screenplay with Fredrica Bailey. He is currently working on his second feature film.


    View the movie trailer here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8MVRWQ1PnMo&t=1s

    Co-sponsored by the Education Department, BCSC Black Heritage Series, The Center for the Study of Race and Ethnicity in America (CSREA), the Physics Department, the Department of Modern Culture and Media and the Malcolm S. Forbes Center for Culture and Media Studies, and the Taubman Center for American Politics and Policy

  • Lunch Break: A conversation with filmmaker Stefon Bristol

    Location: 164 Angell Street, Providence, RI 02912 Room: Room 202 (Flex Space)
    Show Details

    Brooklyn-born, Long Island-bred, Stefon Bristol is writing his own success story as a fresh face with a creative voice in the indie film world. Bristol is an award-winning filmmaker whose first feature film, See You Yesterday , has received two Independent Spirit Award nominations, Best First Feature and Best First Screenplay with Fredrica Bailey. He is currently working on his second feature film.

    Join Bristol for a small-group conversation on his career trajectory, the importance of creating films that reflect society, and more. Registration is required, and limited to 25 students. Register here.

    A screening of See You Yesterday and panel discussion with Bristol, Stephon Alexander (Physics), and Jonathan Collins (Education) will take place later this day, 6:30-8:30 p.m., and is open to the public. More details can be found here .

  • 2020 MLK Lecture: A Conversation with Beverly Daniel Tatum, Ph.D.

    Location: Salomon Center for Teaching Room: 101 Cost: Free
    Show Details

    2020 MLK Lecture: A Conversation with Beverly Daniel Tatum, Ph.D.

    Featuring

    Beverly Daniel Tatum, Ph.D.

    President Emerita of Spelman College
    Author, Why Are All the Black Kids Sitting Together in the Cafeteria? And Other Conversations about Race and Can We Talk about Race? And Other Conversations in an Era of School Resegregation

    Tuesday, February 11, 2020

    6-7:30 p.m.

    Salomon Center for Teaching, De Ciccio Family Auditorium

    Tickets Required - available starting 1/30
    drtatumatbrown.eventbrite.com

    SPONSORED BY THE OFFICE OF INSTITUTIONAL EQUITY AND DIVERSITY

    To request special services, accommodations or assistance for this event, please contact the University Event & Conference Services Office at [email protected] or 401-863-3100

  • What I Am Thinking About Now: Jayanti Owens, “What Drives Racial/Ethnic Disparities in School Discipline?”

    Location: Center for the Study of Race and Ethnicity in America (CSREA) Room: Room 103 Cost: Free
    Show Details

    Please join us for a “What I Am Thinking About Now” presentation by Jayanti Owens, Mary Tefft and John Hazen White, Sr. Assistant Professor of Sociology and International & Public Affairs at Brown University. Her talk is titled, “What Drives Racial/Ethnic Disparities in School Discipline?”

    Are Black and Latinx students suspended and expelled from school at higher rates than White students because of their greater exposure to punitive schools (“racialized sorting”) or because they are perceived and/or treated more harshly for identical misbehavior in the same types of schools (“differential behavior perceptions” and “differential treatment/support,” respectively)? This article disentangles these three key mechanisms of racial disparities in school discipline by combining school administrative data with an online video vignette experiment with 1,000 teachers across the U.S. As front-line actors, teacher-respondents provide both textual and quantitative reports of a randomly-assigned student’s misbehavior and their decisions on whether to instigate school intervention. I find that racialized school sorting plays the largest role: if White students were to equally attend disadvantaged and minority schools, they would experience similarly high rates of school discipline as Black and Latinx students. Differential behavior perceptions and differential treatment/support also gain some empirical support.

    RSVP: [email protected] . Snacks and caffeine will be provided.

    “What I Am Thinking About Now” is an on-going informal workshop/seminar series to which faculty and graduate students are invited to present and discuss recently published work and work in progress. All are invited to attend and participate.

  • Please join us for a “What I Am Thinking About Now” presentation by Jin Li, Professor of Education and Human Development at Brown University, and Yoko Yamamoto, Visiting Assistant Professor of Education at Brown University. The title of their talk is, “When Silence is No Longer Golden: Low-income Chinese American Preschoolers’ Beliefs About Learning and their Achievement.”

    Research in child development and education consistently places Asian American children at the higher achievement end. However, most of this research is on middle-class children; very little research exists on low-income children. Their research followed 300 preschool children starting at 4 from three backgrounds: middle-class European American (EA) and both middle-class (MCA) and low-income Chinese American (LCA). To elicit their learning beliefs, we engaged each child in completing two stories with one showing a hard-working bird learning and succeeding how to fly and another depicting a bear trying to learn how to catch fish but giving up after failure. Children were also tested for their achievement in math, reading, and oral expression. We found that LCA children are behind their EA and MCA peers in developing learning beliefs (both EA mind-based and East-Asian virtue-based). LCA children are also behind their middle-class peers in math and reading achievement. Most striking is their significantly lower oral expression. In a culture that places a high premium on verbal skills, LCAs are severely disadvantaged. Implications for education policy and practice will be discussed.

    RSVP: [email protected] . Snacks and caffeine will be provided.

    “What I Am Thinking About Now” is an on-going informal workshop/seminar series to which faculty and graduate students are invited to present and discuss recently published work and work in progress. All are invited to attend and participate.

  • Education Studies Makeover!

    Location: 164 Angell Street, Providence, RI 02912 Room: Room 202
    Show Details

    Have you heard? The Education Studies concentration has been revamped! Late last year, we introduced changes to the undergraduate program.

    Current concentrators – come learn what the new concentration means for you and how can you take advantage of it!

    Students looking to learn more – come hear all the details and meet other ES students!

    Please join us Thursday, 1/30, at 8 pm in the Education Department (164 Angell Street, 2nd floor) to learn about the changes. Dessert will be served!

  • Master of Arts in Teaching Info Session

    Location: 164 Angell Street Room: Room 275
    Show Details

    Learn how the one-year Master of Arts in Teaching program equips future teachers with the tools required to fill the most pressing needs of urban secondary school classrooms in the United States. Registration is required, please register here.

    Program features include:

    • Small cohort size that enables powerful community-building
    • Specializations in secondary English Language Arts, History/Social Studies, Math, and Science
    • An immersive 4-week summer experience teaching local students, plus a 1- year residency in a Providence district or charter school
    • Culturally responsive teaching that promotes authentic engagement and academic rigor among diverse students
    • Generous merit and need-based scholarships up to the full cost of tuition, living stipends, health fees and insurance

    Meet current students and faculty to learn about the redesigned program for the 2020-2021 academic year!

  • Master of Arts in Teaching Info Session for STEM concentrators

    Location: 164 Angell Street Room: Room 275
    Show Details

    Are you a Brown undergraduate concentrating in a STEM field? Join faculty and students from the Master of Arts in Teaching program to learn how you can become a secondary teacher (grades 7-12) in the STEM field in one year, and how you can get full tuition and support in the form of loan forgiveness through the Urban Education Fellowship for the degree. Registration is required, please register here.

    Program features include:

    • Small cohort size that enables powerful community-building
    • Specializations in secondary English Language Arts, History/Social Studies, Math, and Science
    • An immersive 4-week summer experience teaching local students, plus a 1- year residency in a Providence district or charter school
    • Culturally responsive teaching that promotes authentic engagement and academic rigor among diverse students
    • Generous merit and need-based scholarships up to the full cost of tuition, living stipends, health fees and insurance

    Meet current students and faculty to learn about the redesigned program for the 2020-2021 academic year!

  • Urban Education Policy Master’s Program Information Session

    Location: 164 Angell Street, Providence, RI 02912 Room: Room 202
    Show Details

    The info session will also be livestreamed. Registration is required for both in-person attendance and digital participation. Please register here.

    Discover how the one-year Urban Education Policy master’s program empowers students to understand, develop, and promote policies that improve educational outcomes for urban students everywhere.

    What sets the UEP program apart?

    • A small, highly select cohort of diverse graduate students
    • Combines intensive coursework, 9-month internship experience, and personalized coaching
    • Internships coincide with academic courses that build relevant knowledge and skills
    • Recently revised curriculum that pays special attention to race, class, community, and inequality in the context of urban education

    Meet current students and faculty and learn about distinguishing features of the program, research projects led by UEP faculty, the scope of work during the program’s internship placement, and where program alums work and the impact of their work following graduation.

  • Education Studies DUG Pizza with a Prof

    Location: 164 Angell Street Room: Room 275
    Show Details

    Join the Education Studies DUG for a new series called Pizza with a Prof. They’re informal dinners that offer a space for students and professors to get to know each other outside of the classroom. This month’s conversation will be with Chris Buttimer, Adjunct Lecturer.

  • Education Department Engaged Scholars Program (ESP) Information Luncheon

    Location: 164 Angell Street Room: Room 220
    Show Details

    An Information Session for students who are interested in the Education Department’s Engaged Scholars Program . Education Department ESP Advisor Professor Ken Wong, along with currently-participating students, will talk about the ESP experience!

    Through concentrations affiliated with Engaged Scholars Program, students passionate about social issues pursue courses of study and action to contextualize abstract theories, challenge assumptions, and develop critical skills that prepare them for their future at Brown and beyond.

  • Why Are Teachers Striking?

    Location: 164 Angell Street Room: Room 202
    Show Details
    West Virginia, Oklahoma, Virginia, Los Angeles, Chicago — teachers across the nation are rising for change. What motivates teacher activism and how does it impact the American Educational system? Join Jonathan Collins, Assistant Professor of Education, and Maribeth Calabro, Providence Teachers Union President, for a conversation on the current state of the Teacher Strike Movement and what it means for Rhode Island schools.
     
    Jonathan Collins , Assistant Professor of Education, focuses his research on urban school reform, local politics, race and ethnicity, civic engagement and deliberative democracy. He recently published Do Teachers Want Democracy? Deliberative Culture and Teachers’ Evaluations of Schools in the Urban Affairs Review.
     
    Maribeth Calabro, Providence Teachers Union President.
    Co-sponsored by the Taubman Center for American Politics and Policy. 
  • Education Studies DUG Pizza with a Prof

    Location: 164 Angell Street Room: Room 275
    Show Details

    Join the Education DUG for a new series called Pizza with a Prof. They’re informal dinners that offer a space for students and professors to get to know each other outside of the classroom. Kicking off the series will be Professor Andrea Flores, Assistant Professor of Education. 

  • Master of Arts in Teaching Program Digital Info Session

    Location: Digital Webinar
    Show Details

    Learn how the one-year Master of Arts in Teaching program equips future teachers with the tools required to fill the most pressing needs of urban secondary school classrooms in the United States. Registration is required, please register here.

    Program features include:

    • Small cohort size that enables powerful community-building
    • Specializations in secondary English Language Arts, History/Social Studies, Mat, and Science
    • An immersive 4-week summer experience teaching local students, plus a 1- year residency in a Providence district or charter school
    • Culturally responsive teaching that promotes authentic engagement and academic rigor among diverse students
    • Generous merit and need-based scholarships up to the full cost of tuition, living stipends, health fees and insurance

    Meet current students and faculty to learn about the redesigned program for the 2020-2021 academic year!

  • International Education Week 2019

    Location: Page-Robinson Hall (previously JWW) Room: 310
    Show Details

    International Education Week (IEW), November 18th-23rd, 2019, is a nationally-recognized week that celebrates different cultures, as well as the benefits of international education and exchange worldwide. Please join us at the GBC for our annual IEW events.

  • 5th-Year Urban Education Policy Info Session

    Location: 164 Angell Street Room: Room 275
    Show Details

    Discover how the one-year Urban Education Policy master’s program empowers students to understand, develop, and promote policies that improve educational outcomes for urban students everywhere.

    What sets the UEP program apart?

    • A small, highly select cohort of diverse graduate students
    • Combines intensive coursework, 9-month internship experience, and personalized coaching
    • Internships coincide with academic courses that build relevant knowledge and skills
    • Recently revised curriculum that pays special attention to race, class, community, and inequality in the context of urban education

    Meet current students and faculty and learn about distinguishing features of the program, research projects led by UEP faculty, the scope of work during the program’s internship placement, and where program alums work and the impact of their work following graduation.

    Plus learn about the benefits for 5th-Year UEP students, such as application fee waived, no GRE scores required, and a 1 course load reduction (8 classes instead of 9)! Registration is requested. Please register here.

  • Education Studies Pre-registration Party

    Location: 164 Angell Street Room: Room 202
    Show Details

    Join the Education DUG on Monday, October 28 from 6:30-8pm to eat pizza, learn more about the Education courses being offered next semester, and talk to students who have taken them! Open to all students, feel free to drop by for as little or long as you’d like! The event will take place at 164 Angell Street, Room 202 (Flex Space). Any questions can be directed to [email protected] .

  • Learning from Immigrant Youth: Language Brokering in a Time of Cultural Polarization

    Location: Friedman Hall Room: Room 208
    Show Details

    Presented by: Marjorie Orellana, Professor of Education (UCLA)

    Abstract: In this talk I provide an overview of research on immigrant youth language brokering over the last two decades, considering how understanding of the phenomenon has grown, and what we know about the competencies that youth both develop and display through this work. Given the current sociopolitical context of growing xenophobia and cultural polarization, I suggest what we might all learn from immigrant youth as well as how we might better leverage and support these skills in schools.

  • Master of Arts in Teaching Information Session

    Location: 164 Angell Street Room: Room 202
    Show Details

    Learn how the one-year Master of Arts in Teaching  program equips future teachers with the tools required to fill the most pressing needs of urban secondary school classrooms in the United States.

    Program features include:

    • Small cohort size that enables powerful community-building
    • Specializations in secondary English Language Arts, History/Social Studies, Mat, and Science
    • An immersive 4-week summer experience teaching local students, plus a 1- year residency in a Providence district or charter school
    • Culturally responsive teaching that promotes authentic engagement and academic rigor among diverse students
    • Generous merit and need-based scholarships up to the full cost of tuition, living stipends, health fees and insurance

    Meet current students and faculty to learn about the redesigned program for the 2020-2021 academic year (please note the redesigned program is currently under review by the Rhode Island Department of Education and Brown will offer admissions for the next academic year only after RIDE has approved the new program).

    Registration is required. Please register here.

  • What’s Next for Providence Schools?

    Location: Barus and Holley Room: Room 166
    Show Details

    This workshop is a review and discussion of the distressing report about the Providence Public School District by the John Hopkins Institute for Education Policy. The results of this report led to the state takeover of the district. 

    Students will have the opportunity to hear an overview of the report and then will break into smaller groups to hear from Providence public school parents, students, teachers, administrators, and community partners who will share their feedback about the report and the most productive way for Brown to contribute to long term, sustainable impact in the K-12 schools. Confirmed guests as of 10/2 include:


    Zack Mezera, Director of Providence Student Union
    Melissa Emidy, Director of Inspiring Minds
    Chris Monschauer ’18, Hope High School math teacher
    Brent Kermen, Principal of D’Abate Elementary School
    Christine Wilshire Alves, Rhode Island School for Progressive Education
    Soljane Martinez, Annenberg Institute
    Sarah Leibel, Brown Education Department

    Registration is encouraged. Please register here.  

  • Urban Education Policy Master’s Program Information Session

    Location: 164 Angell Street Room: Room 202
    Show Details

    Discover how the one-year Urban Education Policy master’s program empowers students to understand, develop, and promote policies that improve educational outcomes for urban students everywhere. 

    What sets the UEP program apart?

    • A small, highly select cohort of diverse graduate students
    • Combines intensive coursework, 9-month internship experience, and personalized coaching
    • Internships coincide with academic courses that build relevant knowledge and skills
    • Recently revised curriculum that pays special attention to race, class, community, and inequality in the context of urban education

    Meet current students and faculty and learn about distinguishing features of the program, research projects led by UEP faculty, the scope of work during the program’s internship placement, and where program alums work and the impact of their work following graduation.

    The info session will also be livestreamed. Registration is required for both in-person attendance and digital participation. Please register here.

  • Re/membering: Central American Migration to the U.S.

    Location: Alumnae Hall Room: Crystal Room
    Show Details

    [email protected] invites you to our first interdisciplinary conversation on migration research in theory and practice with Susan Bibler Coutin, Professor of Criminology, Law and Society, and Anthropology, University of California—Irvine.

    Re/membering: Histories of Violence, Survival, and Solidarity
    in Relation to Central America Migration to the U.S.

    The recent arrivals of Central Americans seeking to enter the United States have been construed as an immigration issue. What if these arrivals were instead understood as bearing histories of violence in which the United States is implicated?

    To explore this question, this talk draws on the authors’ engaged fieldwork with Central American immigrants and their allies from the 1980s to the present. It suggests that current conditions forcing Central Americans to the United States are deeply rooted in past political, economic and legal violence. In particular, exclusionary policies have displaced individuals, families, and communities, who in turn have become enclosed within national or other spaces. Sanctuaries and caravans have emerged as a means of challenging spatial necropolitics.

  • Thomas DiPrete ─ How Much Does Schooling Pay? School-to-Work Linkages in Comparative Context

    Location: Watson Institute for International and Public Affairs Room: Joukowsky Forum Cost: Free
    Show Details

    In this talk, DiPrete draws on systematic analysis of cross-national data from the U.S., Germany, and France to ask: does learning occupation-specific skills enhance one’s labor market outcomes? Is it beneficial to have an educational degree that is linked to only one or a small set of occupations? DiPrete argues that, because there is a great deal of variation in the strength of the education-labor market link across Western societies, the answers to these questions are highly dependent on how strongly linked the education system is to the labor market. Amid rising income inequality, an institutional environment that promotes strong school-to-work pathways appears to be an effective strategy for providing workers with secure, well-paying jobs.

     

    https://watson.brown.edu/events/2019/thomas-diprete-how-much-does-schooling-pay-school-work-linkages-comparative-context

  • “Federalism and Education: Cross National Lessons” lunch talk

    Location: 164 Angell Street, Providence, RI 02912 Room: 202 Cost: Free
    Show Details

    The Walter and Leonore Annenberg Professor in Education Policy and Director of the Brown University Urban Education Policy Program Kenneth Wong will present, “Federalism and Education: Cross National Lessons.

    Federalism as a system of decentralized governance has played a central role in charting educational progress in many countries. With an evolving balance between centralization and decentralization, federalism is designed to promote accountability standards without tempering regional and local preferences. Federalism facilitates negotiations both vertically between the central authority and local entities as well as horizontally among diverse interests. Innovative educational practices are often validated by a few local entities prior to scaling up to the national level. Federalism encourages a certain degree of competition at the local and regional level.

    Given these critical issues in federalism and education, this presentation examines ongoing challenges and policy strategies in ten countries, namely Australia, Austria, Belgium, Canada, Germany, Italy, Spain, Switzerland, United Kingdom, and the United States. These case studies, recently published in an edited volume, aim to examine how countries with federal systems govern, finance, and assure quality in their educational systems spanning from early childhood to secondary school graduation. Particular attention is given to functional division between governmental layers of the federal system as well as mechanisms of intergovernmental cooperation both vertically and horizontally. The presentation aims to draw out education policy lessons across the ten federal systems.

  • Ruth Turley Lopez lunch lecture: “Advancing Equity through Research-Practice Partnerships”

    Location: 164 Angell Street, Providence, RI 02912 Room: 202 Cost: Free
    Show Details

    There is growing interest in producing research that directly informs policy and practice in order to advance equity in education. This talk will highlight current efforts, recurring challenges, and possible solutions.

    Ruth Turley’s work aims to improve the connection between education research and policy/practice. In 2011, she founded the Houston Education Research Consortium (HERC), a research-practice partnership between Rice University and 10 Houston-area school districts, representing almost 750,000 students. HERC’s research agenda is jointly developed with district leaders, and research findings are shared directly with decision-makers, with the ultimate goal of improving educational equity. In 2015, Dr. Turley founded the National Network of Education Research-Practice Partnerships (NNERPP), which supports, develops, and connects RPPs throughout the country. There are currently 30 member partnerships representing cities such as Chicago, Los Angeles, New York, and San Francisco. To date, she has raised over $25M in research grants for this work. Dr. Turley has served in various elected and appointed positions in national associations such as the American Educational Research Association, the American Sociological Association, and the Society for Research on Educational Effectiveness. She also served on the Texas State Board of Education’s Long-Range Plan for Public Education Steering Committee. She completed her undergraduate work at Stanford University (1996) and her graduate work at Harvard University (1999, 2001). She was a first-generation college student, originally from Laredo, Texas.

  • “Improving STEM Teacher Professional Development and Curriculum”

    Location: 164 Angell Street, Providence, RI 02912 Room: 202 Cost: Free
    Show Details

    In her presentation,“Improving STEM Teacher Professional Development and Curriculum: A Meta-Analysis,” Annenberg Institute Post-doctoral Fellow Kathleen Lynch will present a meta-analysis of preK-12 STEM instructional improvement programs, seeking to understand what content, formats, and activities lead to stronger student outcomes. This work is particularly timely, as the Every Student Succeeds Act requires that districts receiving Title I funds must adopt “evidence-based interventions,” including programs and strategies proven to be effective in raising student achievement. Open to the public, light refreshments served.

  • Scott Warren is the Chief Executive Officer of Generation Citizen. He co-founded the organization at Brown University with fellow student Anna Ninan during their senior year in 2009, and has worked the last seven years to build up GC’s programming and work to expand action civics throughout the country.

    Scott is joined in discussion by Jonathan Collins, Presidential Postdoctoral Fellow in Political Science.


    Scott Warren’s new book, Generation Citizen: The Power of Youth in Our Politics details his political awakening alongside stories of how young people have always been the instruments of political change. Generation Citizen is a practical guide, providing concrete steps to jumpstart an engagement with politics and rekindle our love of democracy. Through interviews with students and historical portraits of young people who have enacted great political change - from the civil rights movement to the election of Ronald Reagan to #BlackLivesMatter and the Parkland students’ standing up to gun violence - Generation Citizen shows that time and again, it is the young people who lead the way to change.

  • “Necesidades Especiales: Intimate Interventions, Early Education and the New Majority”

    Location: 164 Angell Street Room: 202 Cost: Free
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    Dario Valles, Postdoctoral Research Associate in Race & Ethnicity at Brown University’s Watson Institute for International & Public Affairs and Center for the Study of Race & Ethnicity in America (CSREA), will present “Necesidades Especiales: Intimate Interventions, Early Education and the New Majority” as part of the Education Department Spring 2019 Speaker Series.

    Early education for children plays a critical role in narrowing the US racial achievement gap according to mounting evidence. Central, Mexican-American migrant and Black family childcare providers labor at the front lines of preparing for success an emerging majority-minority generation. Drawing from more than three years of ethnography among early educators in California, Valles elucidates home-based caregivers’ everyday practices to mitigate intersecting inequalities that children with necesidades especiales (special needs) and Black and Latinx youth more broadly experience, drawing the analytic gaze towards providers’ cross-cultural intimate interventions as an inclusive early education model designated for the new racial majority.

  • Vigil for Maryori Conde

    Location: Stephen Robert ’62 Campus Center Room: Kasper MPR
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    The Chaplains of the University invite members of the Brown community to gather on Thursday, January 24, at 9 PM, in Kasper Multipurpose Room, for a candlelight vigil to honor services being held in Los Angeles for Brown graduate student Maryori Conde (B.A. ’18), by her family. A campus-wide gathering in memory of Maryori is being planned for early February; details will be announced soon.

  • Lunch Lecture: Emily Rosenzweig, Motivating STEM Learning

    Location: Barus Building Room: Dewey Conference Cost: Free
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    Join us for this Speaker Series lecture with lunch served! Brown University Education Department Adjunct Lecturer Emily Rosenzweig will present, “Harnessing the Power of Motivation to Promote Math and Science Learning.”

    It is critical to help students develop skills in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM), yet many students do not take advantage of STEM learning opportunities or struggle in STEM courses. These issues are often motivational, such as when students experience boredom, frustration, or lack of confidence. Motivation refers to students’ beliefs, values, goals, and energy that drive them towards or away from learning. This talk will discuss the role of motivation in students’ learning of STEM subjects, focusing on two particular motivational beliefs: Beliefs that learning is valuable and beliefs about the negative aspects of learning (called cost). The talk will first discuss research demonstrating that value and cost beliefs are critical factors affecting students’ math and science engagement and achievement. The talk then discusses intervention work aimed at increasing students’ perceptions of value and reducing their perceptions of cost in order to promote their engagement and achievement in STEM courses.
  • Become a Teacher: MAT Information Session

    Location: Institute at Brown for Environment & Society (IBES) Room: 015 Cost: Free
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    LEARN, TEACH, LEAD. Earn a Master of Arts in Teaching degree and teacher certification in secondary English, history/social studies, or science (biology, chemistry, or physics). Join us at our MAT information session on 12/8 to learn about the program directly from faculty, staff, current students, and alumni.  Please RSVP at https://tinyurl.com/mat-information today!

  • Urban Education Policy Master’s Program Info Session

    Location: Barus Building Room: Student Lounge Cost: Free
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    Become an education change agent! Stay at Brown for a 5th year and earn your master’s in Urban Education Policy. Join us at our 12/6 Brown UEP information session to learn about Brown’s one-year graduate program directly from UEP faculty, staff, and current students. Please RSVP at the below link.

  • MAT 5th-Year Application Help Session

    Location: Barus Building Room: Dewey Conference Room Cost: Free
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    Are you a current Brown University senior interested in staying a fifth year to earn your M.A.T. degree with teacher certification in either secondary English, history/social studies, or science (biology, chemistry, or physics/engineering)?

    MAT faculty and staff will be on hand to guide you through the application process and answer any questions! Pizza will be provided.

    Please RSVP  by Friday, November 30.

  • Lunch Lecture: Leigh Wedenoja on Student-Teacher Relationships

    Location: Barus Building Room: Dewey Conference Cost: Free
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    Join the Education Department for this Speaker Series lecture by Brown University Postdoctoral Research Associate Leigh Wedenoja, “Second Time’s the Charm? How Repeated Student-Teacher Matches Contribute to Cognitive and Non-cognitive Achievement”

    There is increasing research on the importance of the student-teacher relationship to student achievement. Recent work has found that elementary students who have the same teacher two years in a row perform better on math exams and surveys of parents and teachers support these types of “looping” classrooms. However, the mechanisms through which a repeat teacher improves performance, especially in middle and high school, is less understood. This talk expands the literature in two ways. First, it estimates the effect of teachers on non-cognitive outcomes: attendance, truancy, and disciplinary incidents. Second, it estimates the effect of having a repeat teacher in middle and high school. We find that having a repeat teacher improves both reading and math scores across all grades and that it decreases absences and truancy in high school. The results are robust to controlling for quality and experience of the repeat teacher. We believe this is evidence that repeat student-teacher matches in middle and high school contribute to students’ engagement in school as even a single repeat teacher improves attendance for all classes.

  • MAT/UTEP Information Session

    Location: Barus Building Room: Dewey Conference Cost: Free
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    LEARN, TEACH, LEAD. Earn teacher certification in secondary English, history/social studies, or science (biology, chemistry, or physics) in one year! Through the 5th-year Master of Arts in Teaching (MAT) program, you will also receive a master’s degree. Through the Undergraduate Teacher Education Program (UTEP), earn secondary certification along with your undergraduate degree. Join us for an information session on Thursday, October 25th from 12-1pm at 340 Brook Street, Dewey Conference Room (2nd floor). Pizza will be provided. Please RSVP at http://tinyurl.com/mat-utep-info .

  • Lindsey Jones lunch talk: Education & Incarceration in the Lives of Marginalized Black Girls

    Location: Barus Building Room: Dewey Conf. Rm. Cost: Free
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    Join the Education Department for our second Fall 2018 Speaker Series lecture! Brown University Presidential Diversity Postdoctoral Fellow Lindsey Jones will present “Education and Incarceration in the Lives of Marginalized Black Girls: A Historical Perspective,” examining the case of an early-20th-century juvenile reformatory for delinquent African American girls to argue that a historical perspective can both enrich our understanding of black girls’ experiences of criminalization and enable more effective advocacy on behalf of this vulnerable population. Light lunch served. 

  • Ed Dept Talk: Kendra Bischoff, “The Racial Composition of Neighborhoods and Local Schools”

    Location: Barus Building Room: Dewey Conference Cost: Free
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    Join the Education Department on 9/20 from 12-1 p.m. for a Speaker Series lecture by Cornell University’s Kendra Bischoff. Dr. Bischoff will present “The Racial Composition of Neighborhoods and Local Schools: The Role of Diversity, Inequality, and School Choice.” In an education system that draws students from residentially-based attendance zones, schools are local institutions that reflect the racial composition of their surrounding communities. However, with opportunities to opt-out of the zoned public school system, the social and economic contexts of neighborhoods may affect the demographic link between neighborhoods and their public neighborhood schools. Using spatial data on school attendance zones, Dr. Bischoff estimates the associations between the racial composition of elementary schools and their local neighborhoods, and investigating how neighborhood factors shape the loose or tight demographic coupling of these parallel social contexts.

  • 5th-Year MAT/UTEP Info Session

    Location: Barus Building Room: Dewey Conference Cost: Free
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    LEARN, TEACH, LEAD. Earn teacher certification in secondary English, history/social studies, or science (biology, chemistry, or physics). Through the 5th-year Master of Arts in Teaching (MAT) program, you will also receive a master’s degree. Through the Undergraduate Teacher Education Program (UTEP), earn secondary certification along with your undergraduate degree. Join us for an information session to learn more. Pizza provided!

    Please RSVP at http://tinyurl.com/mat-utep-info

  • LGBTQ+ Grad & Med Student Dessert Social

    Location: Stephen Robert ’62 Campus Center Room: Kasper Multipurpose Room
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    Join us for an informal gathering. Meet the professional staff of the LGBTQ Center, mingle with incoming and existing graduate students and learn about varying resources available on campus. All master’s, doctoral and medical students are welcome. Wine and dessert will be served; non-alcoholic options available. Families and children are welcome.

    When: Friday, August 31st from 4:30 - 5:30 pm

    Where: Kasper Multipurpose Room (lower level of the Robert Campus Center)

  • Film Screening with Enrique Alemán: “Stolen Education”

    Location: BERT 130
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    Please join us at 4:15 p.m. on Tuesday, April 17, when Dr. Enrique Alemán, Jr., Professor and Chair in the Department of Educational Leadership & Policy Studies at the University of Texas at San Antonio, will screen “Stolen Education,” a film documenting the untold story of Mexican-American school children who challenged discrimination in Texas schools in the 1950’s and changed the face of education in the Southwest. The screening will include a Q&A with Dr. Alemán, followed by an informal reception at 5:45, and is free and open to the public. This event is co-sponsored by the Brown Department of Education, The Center for Latin American and Caribbean Studies (CLACS), and the Center for the Study of Race + Ethnicity in America (CSREA).
    As a 9 year-old second grader, Lupe had been forced to remain in the first grade for three years, not because of her academic performance but solely because she was Mexican American. She was one of eight young students who testified in a federal court case in 1956 to end the discriminatory practice. Degraded for speaking Spanish and dissuaded from achieving academically, Mexican American students were relegated to a “beginner,” “low,” and then “high” first grade – a practice that was not uncommon across the Southwest. School officials argued in the case that this practice was necessary because the “retardation of Latin children” would adversely impact the education of White children.
    “Stolen Education” portrays the courage of these young people, testifying in an era when fear and intimidation were used to maintain racial hierarchy and control. The students won the case, but for almost sixty years the case was never spoken about in the farming community where they lived despite its significance. The film presents the full story and impact for the first time, featuring the personal accounts of most of those who were at the center of the court case. The film documents not only an important moment in Mexican American history, but also provides important context to understand our current educational system’s enduring legacy of segregation, discrimination and racism.
  • The Brown Education Department Diversity Inclusion & Action Plan (DIAP) Committee is hosting a Spring 2018 DIAP Conference in Barus and Holley, Room 166 featuring workshops led by youth, community members, and educators as well as a closing keynote by poet and author Clint Smith. The conference goal is to bring together community voices to engage in critical dialogue and discuss actionable steps towards addressing education inequity in the classroom, in the community, and through policy change. The event is free and open to the public, but we ask that you register via Eventbrite by March 9th, 2018 if you are planning on attending for the full day in order to ensure appropriate refreshments for all.
  • Education Dept Lecture: Elizabeth Mann on Education Policy Making and Design

    Location: Barus Building (Education Department), Dewey Conference Room
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    Elizabeth Mann, a Fellow in the Brown Center on Education Policy at the Brookings Institution, will present, “Examining the Relationship between Institutional Design and State Education Policy with a New Measure of Centralization” as part of our Education Department Spring 2018 Speaker Series. A political scientist by training, Dr. Mann studies how institutional constraints shape the policymaking process and policy design with a focus on K-12 education policy. Her current research includes creating a new measure of state governance centralization and examining cross-state variation in education policy. She is also the principal investigator of a project examining participation and influence of education organizations in the federal rulemaking process in the context of the Every Student Succeeds Act. This lecture is free and open to the public; light lunch served.
  • Ed. Dept Lecture: Travis Bristol, Increasing Ethnoracial Diversity for Teachers in Urban Public Schools

    Location: Barus Building (Education Department), Dewey Conference Room
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    In the first lecture of the Education Department Spring 2018 Speaker Series, Boston University Peter Paul Assistant Professor Travis Bristol will deliver a lecture entitled, “Policy Levers for Increasing the Ethnoracial Diversity of Teachers in Urban Public Schools.” The lecture is free and open to the public, and light refreshments will be served.
  • 5th-Year MAT Application Help Session

    Location: Barus Building (Education Department), Dewey Conference Room
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    Current Brown students: are you planning on staying on at Brown for a 5th year to earn your Master of Arts in Teaching degree with teacher certification in elementary or secondary (English, history/social studies, or science) education? Our MAT program faculty and staff will be on hand December 5th to guide you through the application process. Pizza served! Please RSVP by Friday, 12/1.
  • Become a Teacher: MAT Info Session

    Location: Stephen Robert ’62 Campus Center, Petteruti Lounge, 201
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    LEARN, TEACH, LEAD. Earn teacher certification in elementary education or secondary education (English, History/Social Studies, Biology, Chemistry, or Physics) along with your Master of Arts in Teaching (MAT) degree! Join us for an Information Session on Saturday, December 2nd from 12-1 p.m. in Petteruti Lounge, 75 Waterman Street, Room 201 to learn about our program in detail from our faculty, staff, current students, and alumni!
    Please RSVP at http://tinyurl.com/mat-open-house.
  • Urban Education Policy Open House

    Location: Education Department - Waterman St
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    Join faculty, staff and current students to learn more about Brown’s one-year Urban Education Policy master’s program. Learn how you can become a change agent with a UEP degree! Presentations will cover admissions, financial aid, internships, alumni connections, and any other questions you bring with you! Light dinner served. Location: 131 Waterman Street, Providence